Nhà Sinh Học Trẻ

Diễn Đàn của những Bạn Trẻ yêu thích Sinh Học
Hôm nay, Thứ tư 17/07/19 5:49 am

Thời gian được tính theo giờ UTC + 7 Giờ




Tạo chủ đề mới Gửi bài trả lời  [ 1 bài viết ] 
Người gửi Nội dung
Gửi bàiĐã gửi: Thứ tư 10/03/10 3:08 pm 
Ngoại tuyến
Người điều hành
Người điều hành

Ngày tham gia: Thứ tư 07/03/07 1:41 am
Bài viết: 207
Source: http://jcs.biologists.org/cgi/content/full/121/11/1771
Martin A. Schwartz

Department of Microbiology, UVA Health System, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA

Tựa đề rất "hit", nhỉ? ;)

Trích dẫn
"...
For almost all of us, one of the reasons that we liked science in high school and college is that we were good at it. That can't be the only reason – fascination with understanding the physical world and an emotional need to discover new things has to enter into it too. But high-school and college science means taking courses, and doing well in courses means getting the right answers on tests. If you know those answers, you do well and get to feel smart.

A Ph.D., in which you have to do a research project, is a whole different thing. For me, it was a daunting task. How could I possibly frame the questions that would lead to significant discoveries; design and interpret an experiment so that the conclusions were absolutely convincing; foresee difficulties and see ways around them, or, failing that, solve them when they occurred? ...

...
I'd like to suggest that our Ph.D. programs often do students a disservice in two ways. First, I don't think students are made to understand how hard it is to do research. And how very, very hard it is to do important research. It's a lot harder than taking even very demanding courses. What makes it difficult is that research is immersion in the unknown. We just don't know what we're doing. We can't be sure whether we're asking the right question or doing the right experiment until we get the answer or the result. Admittedly, science is made harder by competition for grants and space in top journals. But apart from all of that, doing significant research is intrinsically hard and changing departmental, institutional or national policies will not succeed in lessening its intrinsic difficulty.

Second, we don't do a good enough job of teaching our students how to be productively stupid – that is, if we don't feel stupid it means we're not really trying.
...
Productive stupidity means being ignorant by choice. Focusing on important questions puts us in the awkward position of being ignorant. One of the beautiful things about science is that it allows us to bumble along, getting it wrong time after time, and feel perfectly fine as long as we learn something each time.
..."

Một bài viết đáng đọc và suy nghĩ, nhất là với các bạn đang đau đầu với quyết định, PhD hay k :)

_________________
on my way ...!


Đầu trang
 Xem thông tin cá nhân  
 
Hiển thị những bài viết cách đây:  Sắp xếp theo  
Tạo chủ đề mới Gửi bài trả lời  [ 1 bài viết ] 

Thời gian được tính theo giờ UTC + 7 Giờ


Ai đang trực tuyến?

Đang xem chuyên mục này: Không có thành viên nào đang trực tuyến2 khách


Bạn không thể tạo chủ đề mới trong chuyên mục này.
Bạn không thể trả lời bài viết trong chuyên mục này.
Bạn không thể sửa những bài viết của mình trong chuyên mục này.
Bạn không thể xoá những bài viết của mình trong chuyên mục này.
Bạn không thể gửi tập tin đính kèm trong chuyên mục này.

Tìm kiếm với từ khoá:
Chuyển đến:  
POWERED_BY
Vietnamese language pack for phpBB 3.0.x download and support.